President & Group Managing Director: Dr.Shelly Ahmed | Editor in Chief & CEO: M H Ahssan
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query interview. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query interview. Sort by date Show all posts

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Beware! Fake Job Offers On The Rise With 'Freshers'

By Lokesh Settiar / Bangalore

Intel Files Police Complaint, Nasscom Plans Big Public Campaign. Fake job interview letters and agents claiming to be working on behalf of companies to hire people have become a menace again, and those looking for jobs should watch out. It’s expected to get particularly bad this year with fewer jobs on offer and many more students passing out of colleges. 
    
Intel India has just filed a police complaint in Bangalore, after it found that at least two people had received fraudulent letters calling them for interviews at the company’s office and asking them to make a security deposit of Rs 7,850 prior to the interview. 

Thursday, January 30, 2014

RaGa Interview: Why The Youth Congress Is Cheering?

By Pallavi Polanki (Guest Writer)

Going by the number of times Congress leader Rahul Gandhi spoke of ‘opening up the system’ and bringing in ‘youngsters’ in his first one-on-one TV interview on Monday night, it seems as if an imminent crackdown awaits the party ahead of the Lok Sabha election. 

The interview comes less than a fortnight after the AICC meet at which Gandhi was given the formidable task of leading the party’s election campaign for the upcoming general election.

Thursday, May 02, 2013

WHY FACULTY CRUNCH IN INDIAN COLLEGES?

By Sindhi Sinha / New Delhi

Faculty crunch is a known phenomenon in India and with the opening of hundreds of academic institutions in both public and private domain, the shortage of good people in teaching, awaits a much harsher reality. However, in many institutions, the dearth of new faculty is an outcome of a non-serious and dismissive attitude of the selection committee itself. Figure this out – a Central University announced faculty recruitment a year and a half back before shortlisting the candidates for interviews. 

Monday, December 02, 2013

Salman Tells Karan Johar He’s A 'Teetotaller And A Virgin'

By Niloufer Khan | Mumbai

Last night, the new season of Koffee With Karan had what was meant to be a blockbuster opening episode. Salman Khan, who rarely appears on interview shows, graced the Koffee With Karan set. If you’ve watched the show, then you know why Khan doesn’t go for interviews. 

Twelve hours later, I’m still trying to make sense of what he said. First, let’s focus for a moment on the return of Koffee with Karan, where stars come and go, none of them talk of Michalangelo. The “buzz” this season is that Karan Johar will interview stars in pairs (which he’s done before) and perhaps even in triplet (an ode to season three?). Next week, Kareena Kapoor Khan will be interviewed with her cousin, Ranbir Kapoor. 

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

'Rahul's Blurring Lines Between Novice And Politician'

By Aniket Sharma | INN Live

ANALYSIS There are occasions when the dividing line between the real and the fictional blurs. Yesterday’s interview of Rahul Gandhi, conducted by Arnab Goswami of Times Now was one of them. On screen was one of the few Indian politicians with movie star looks and his answers seemed to be out of one of those half-baked, incoherent and painfully unrealistic films that Bollywood regularly churns out in an effort to make some money off the nation's interest in political figures. 

Monday, July 11, 2005

RIGHT ATTITUDE FOR INTERVIEWS

By M H Ahsan

The most confusing thing for an applicant while going for an interview is whether his interviewer wants him or her to have the right attitude or essential skills for the job. Most employers and professionals believe that the quality rather than quantity of degrees is more desirable in an interviewee. It is the right attitude and optimism, which takes one aspirant far ahead than others. You as a contender might be over qualified for the job that you are applying to but unless you have the confidence you could lose the job even to a less able candidate. Many things have to be kept in mind while preparing for and giving an interview including those mentioned below.

Time of arrival
You should neither arrive too late or too early to an interview. Coming early by one hour or more would send the wrong signal that you are too free for this particular job and are more than eager to join it. Even 30 minutes early would be a bit too much. The ideal time is to reach the place approximately 10 minutes before the interview. If you come at your listed time you might miss on some important announcements that are made at the last minute or you might just panic being in a new environment. So you should be well planned and decide before hand how do you intend to go keeping in mind the traffic and other possibilities. You must by any chance reach the office at least 5 minutes before the interview but the best time is 10 minutes early.

Treatment to the receptionist
You might think that the receptionist is just to attend to your concerns and queries but you are wrong. She is not even there to comfort you. She is an important person in the office and surprisingly has a say in the selection of candidates and thus you should be at your best even in front of her. She should not realize your nervousness and tension as could report it to the officials later on. A receptionist is one who sees you unaware and thus notices your true personality and ideology. So must be extra cautious in front of her as she might prove instrumental in your acquiring of a particular job.

Reason to work for the company
When the company officials ask you why you want the job then you never ought to say that the short distance to the office suits you or that you need the money that you would get as salary. You must never show them that you need their services but try to inculcate the habit of saying that you would like to help the firm or organization by applying your skills and dedication to your job and thus raising their status because the company wants to hire you for their own benefit and not to help you financial or oblige you by giving you the job. They need your services and not provide you facilities. Hence you must show eagerness to help them so that they hire you.

Talking about current boss
While you are being interviewed you might be asked to say something or to give your view point on your current boss as the interviewers try to steal information about your personality in this way. By being negative and complaining you could render negative information about yourself, which could hamper your application. You should convert your sour experiences into learning and positive ones and try to say minimum as you might be cross-questioned which may land you in trouble. You should always try to say best about your current boss and mention his good traits. No matter how strained relationships you might be having with your boss those should never come into acquaintance with your interviewer. Saying badly about others delivers negative about us too.

Reason you left your last job
The reasons you provide to the interviewers for your leaving the current job ought to depict your positive and move ahead in life attitude. Problem with colleagues or other members of organization would give a hint that you are uncooperative and not adjusting no matter what the truth is. You must never blame anybody but say that it is because that you believe in growing that you think that a change in job could help you. Too much expectation as a reason to leave the job sounds as if you run away from responsibilities and are a coward. So you should mention that change in life is only a means to grow and that you would like to work with such a prosperous and growing company like them and also help them with your hard working abilities, unmatched skills and experience.

The questions you should ask When given the opportunity to ask questions you should not give into the flow and ask about benefits and vacation time including salary. You should be neutral and ask general questions. But neither should you say that you have researched too well and need not ask anything as they might cross question you and saying this might also show lack of concern nor should you say that they explained the things too well and you do not need any further assistance. The best possible answer could be to prepare certain logical and business type questions which show your knowledge as well as interest. You should ask these questions only if asked to and not demand an answer. Asking relevant questions is very important. You must prepare these questions beforehand as thinking of a question there and then might make you nervous and lead you to ask irrelevant or unnecessary questions.

Thus while preparing or appearing for an interview you should always be extra cautious as to never concentrate on your degrees but on your ability to reach the pinnacle and your attitude. All the employers are looking for are good able candidates who are willing to work hard and take their company ahead. So you must concentrate on your attitude and not your aptitude.

RIGHT ATTITUDE FOR INTERVIEWS

By M H Ahsan

The most confusing thing for an applicant while going for an interview is whether his interviewer wants him or her to have the right attitude or essential skills for the job. Most employers and professionals believe that the quality rather than quantity of degrees is more desirable in an interviewee. It is the right attitude and optimism, which takes one aspirant far ahead than others. You as a contender might be over qualified for the job that you are applying to but unless you have the confidence you could lose the job even to a less able candidate. Many things have to be kept in mind while preparing for and giving an interview including those mentioned below.

Time of arrival
You should neither arrive too late or too early to an interview. Coming early by one hour or more would send the wrong signal that you are too free for this particular job and are more than eager to join it. Even 30 minutes early would be a bit too much. The ideal time is to reach the place approximately 10 minutes before the interview. If you come at your listed time you might miss on some important announcements that are made at the last minute or you might just panic being in a new environment. So you should be well planned and decide before hand how do you intend to go keeping in mind the traffic and other possibilities. You must by any chance reach the office at least 5 minutes before the interview but the best time is 10 minutes early.

Treatment to the receptionist
You might think that the receptionist is just to attend to your concerns and queries but you are wrong. She is not even there to comfort you. She is an important person in the office and surprisingly has a say in the selection of candidates and thus you should be at your best even in front of her. She should not realize your nervousness and tension as could report it to the officials later on. A receptionist is one who sees you unaware and thus notices your true personality and ideology. So must be extra cautious in front of her as she might prove instrumental in your acquiring of a particular job.

Reason to work for the company
When the company officials ask you why you want the job then you never ought to say that the short distance to the office suits you or that you need the money that you would get as salary. You must never show them that you need their services but try to inculcate the habit of saying that you would like to help the firm or organization by applying your skills and dedication to your job and thus raising their status because the company wants to hire you for their own benefit and not to help you financial or oblige you by giving you the job. They need your services and not provide you facilities. Hence you must show eagerness to help them so that they hire you.

Talking about current boss
While you are being interviewed you might be asked to say something or to give your view point on your current boss as the interviewers try to steal information about your personality in this way. By being negative and complaining you could render negative information about yourself, which could hamper your application. You should convert your sour experiences into learning and positive ones and try to say minimum as you might be cross-questioned which may land you in trouble. You should always try to say best about your current boss and mention his good traits. No matter how strained relationships you might be having with your boss those should never come into acquaintance with your interviewer. Saying badly about others delivers negative about us too.

Reason you left your last job
The reasons you provide to the interviewers for your leaving the current job ought to depict your positive and move ahead in life attitude. Problem with colleagues or other members of organization would give a hint that you are uncooperative and not adjusting no matter what the truth is. You must never blame anybody but say that it is because that you believe in growing that you think that a change in job could help you. Too much expectation as a reason to leave the job sounds as if you run away from responsibilities and are a coward. So you should mention that change in life is only a means to grow and that you would like to work with such a prosperous and growing company like them and also help them with your hard working abilities, unmatched skills and experience.

The questions you should ask When given the opportunity to ask questions you should not give into the flow and ask about benefits and vacation time including salary. You should be neutral and ask general questions. But neither should you say that you have researched too well and need not ask anything as they might cross question you and saying this might also show lack of concern nor should you say that they explained the things too well and you do not need any further assistance. The best possible answer could be to prepare certain logical and business type questions which show your knowledge as well as interest. You should ask these questions only if asked to and not demand an answer. Asking relevant questions is very important. You must prepare these questions beforehand as thinking of a question there and then might make you nervous and lead you to ask irrelevant or unnecessary questions.

Thus while preparing or appearing for an interview you should always be extra cautious as to never concentrate on your degrees but on your ability to reach the pinnacle and your attitude. All the employers are looking for are good able candidates who are willing to work hard and take their company ahead. So you must concentrate on your attitude and not your aptitude.

RIGHT ATTITUDE FOR INTERVIEWS

By M H Ahsan

The most confusing thing for an applicant while going for an interview is whether his interviewer wants him or her to have the right attitude or essential skills for the job. Most employers and professionals believe that the quality rather than quantity of degrees is more desirable in an interviewee. It is the right attitude and optimism, which takes one aspirant far ahead than others. You as a contender might be over qualified for the job that you are applying to but unless you have the confidence you could lose the job even to a less able candidate. Many things have to be kept in mind while preparing for and giving an interview including those mentioned below.

Time of arrival
You should neither arrive too late or too early to an interview. Coming early by one hour or more would send the wrong signal that you are too free for this particular job and are more than eager to join it. Even 30 minutes early would be a bit too much. The ideal time is to reach the place approximately 10 minutes before the interview. If you come at your listed time you might miss on some important announcements that are made at the last minute or you might just panic being in a new environment. So you should be well planned and decide before hand how do you intend to go keeping in mind the traffic and other possibilities. You must by any chance reach the office at least 5 minutes before the interview but the best time is 10 minutes early.

Treatment to the receptionist
You might think that the receptionist is just to attend to your concerns and queries but you are wrong. She is not even there to comfort you. She is an important person in the office and surprisingly has a say in the selection of candidates and thus you should be at your best even in front of her. She should not realize your nervousness and tension as could report it to the officials later on. A receptionist is one who sees you unaware and thus notices your true personality and ideology. So must be extra cautious in front of her as she might prove instrumental in your acquiring of a particular job.

Reason to work for the company
When the company officials ask you why you want the job then you never ought to say that the short distance to the office suits you or that you need the money that you would get as salary. You must never show them that you need their services but try to inculcate the habit of saying that you would like to help the firm or organization by applying your skills and dedication to your job and thus raising their status because the company wants to hire you for their own benefit and not to help you financial or oblige you by giving you the job. They need your services and not provide you facilities. Hence you must show eagerness to help them so that they hire you.

Talking about current boss
While you are being interviewed you might be asked to say something or to give your view point on your current boss as the interviewers try to steal information about your personality in this way. By being negative and complaining you could render negative information about yourself, which could hamper your application. You should convert your sour experiences into learning and positive ones and try to say minimum as you might be cross-questioned which may land you in trouble. You should always try to say best about your current boss and mention his good traits. No matter how strained relationships you might be having with your boss those should never come into acquaintance with your interviewer. Saying badly about others delivers negative about us too.

Reason you left your last job
The reasons you provide to the interviewers for your leaving the current job ought to depict your positive and move ahead in life attitude. Problem with colleagues or other members of organization would give a hint that you are uncooperative and not adjusting no matter what the truth is. You must never blame anybody but say that it is because that you believe in growing that you think that a change in job could help you. Too much expectation as a reason to leave the job sounds as if you run away from responsibilities and are a coward. So you should mention that change in life is only a means to grow and that you would like to work with such a prosperous and growing company like them and also help them with your hard working abilities, unmatched skills and experience.

The questions you should ask When given the opportunity to ask questions you should not give into the flow and ask about benefits and vacation time including salary. You should be neutral and ask general questions. But neither should you say that you have researched too well and need not ask anything as they might cross question you and saying this might also show lack of concern nor should you say that they explained the things too well and you do not need any further assistance. The best possible answer could be to prepare certain logical and business type questions which show your knowledge as well as interest. You should ask these questions only if asked to and not demand an answer. Asking relevant questions is very important. You must prepare these questions beforehand as thinking of a question there and then might make you nervous and lead you to ask irrelevant or unnecessary questions.

Thus while preparing or appearing for an interview you should always be extra cautious as to never concentrate on your degrees but on your ability to reach the pinnacle and your attitude. All the employers are looking for are good able candidates who are willing to work hard and take their company ahead. So you must concentrate on your attitude and not your aptitude.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Deepika Padukone Speaks Out About 'Battling Depression'

Bollywood star actress, diva Deepika Padukone is a class apart. In an industry where actresses are tight-lipped about various facets of their lives, she has consistently been as vocal and open as possible (without completely scandalising her fan-base), be it about her relationships or being objectified by the media.

Recently, Padukone gave an exclusive interview to a vernacular news channel where, for the first time, she spoke in detail about her battle with depression.

Monday, March 10, 2014

Exposed: Video Of Kejriwal Asking Anchor Prasun Joshi To Play Up Parts Of Interview On TV Channel Which Goes Viral

By Rahul Singh | INNLIVE

A video showing AAP leader Arvind Kejriwal asking a TV news anchor to emphasise certain sections of his interview has gone viral on Youtube. The video received 181,501 hits in a few hours. The video, which is over a minute long, shows Kejriwal and the news anchor in a conversation after the interview.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

News Analysis: Did 'Yaqub Memon' Make A 'Big Mistake' By Trusting Indian Investigators And Government?

The unfortunate Mumbai blast convict Yaqub Memon finally got rejection for his all pleas to live in this world and ordered to get hanged on his 'birthday' when he turns 53 years, the gnawing question that will continue to stare us in the face is not if he ever participated in the conspiracy and its execution, but if the Indian investigating agencies betrayed him and used his own evidence to hang him.

The moot point is certainly not about law, but about ethics. If the evidence, even voluntarily submitted by him, proves his criminality, he deserves punishment. But if he was duped into a sense of safety, it was unethical because it would have made him complacent and thereby denied himself a fair shot at the legal avenues.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Congress Vs Modi: Who Is Falling Into Whose Trap?

By M H Ahssan / INN Bureau

Whether Narendra Modi wins or loses the grand electoral battle of the 2014 general elections, what demands attention is his attempt to trigger a major paradigm shift in Indian politics.

The Gujarat chief minister and BJP’s Chief Poll Campaigner for the 2014 elections is not just attempting to decisively win over non-Muslim voters but go beyond into hitherto uncharted waters. Given the RSS-BJP blood flowing through his veins, seeking to unite and consolidate Hindu votes is a given. That was something that even the BJP patriarch LK Advani attempted with the Rath Yatra in 1990. What Modi is attempting today is to focus on redefining secularism in India as it has been preached and practised for decades in Indian politics.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Spotlight: Is Shahrukh Khan The 'Iron Man' Of Bollywood?

By Niloufer Khan / Mumbai

Two years ago, in the course of an interview with Shahrukh Khan, journalist Barkha Dutt asked, “Why don’t we (in India) have a desi equivalent of Superman, Ironman, or Batman?”

Shahrukh replied, “It’s very simple…our regular heroes are superheroes…if you believe in Hindi cinema, they don’t need to wear tights; there is no need for superpowers.”

In Bollywood, the leading man is almost always a hero. When watching a Hollywood movie — with its penchant for flawed and complicated characters who are mentally ill or emotionally flawed — my mother has only one question: “So, is he the hero?”

Saturday, February 23, 2013

Why Being the Last Interview of the Day Could Crush Your Chances?

Sorry, grad school applicants. According to new research, not only must prospective students or job seekers compete against a crowded field of equally appealing candidates, but they also must shine when compared to the randomly selected cluster of applicants who have interviews scheduled on the same day. 

Like gamblers who swear that a run of red numbers at the roulette table means it's time to bet on black, individuals who are tasked with breaking up a series of decisions over a number of days don't always take the long view when making their judgments. As shown in a research paper co-authored by Wharton operations and information management professor Uri Simonsohn, those decisions are affected not only by the expected overall distribution of results but also by the results seen in a single day's small, unrepresentative sample. 

In "Daily Horizons: Evidence of Narrow Bracketing in Judgment from 10 years of MBA-admission Interviews" Psychological Science, Simonsohn and Harvard University professor Francesca Gino used MBA admissions data from a university (that was neither Wharton or Harvard) to study what happened to applicants' scores when they were interviewing at the end of a day and after a series of strong -- or a series of weak -- candidates. ," recently published.

Later in the Day, Lower in the Rankings
Their theory was that a phenomenon called "narrow bracketing" was affecting how those late-day candidates were being judged. Put simply, narrow bracketing is when an individual makes a decision without taking into account the consequences of many similar choices. At the roulette wheel, a gambler who knows that the wheel's odds of turning up red or black are 50/50 will look at the day's results -- which are often displayed by the casino -- and predict a run of a certain color, even though a subset of a croupier's spins is not necessarily representative of the expected overall distribution. Simonsohn and Gino posited that a similar effect happens in the business world, too, when professionals are faced with spreading a long string of similar decisions over multiple days. 

On a five-point scale, with five being the best possible score, a similarly qualified applicant who interviewed on the tail end of his top-scoring competition got lower scores overall than what he or she would have otherwise received. Conversely, those who interviewed after a group of weaker competitors got better than expected evaluations. The data covered more than 9,000 interviews done by 31 interviewers, none of whom were alumni.

"If [an interviewer] interviewed four people, and all four have been good, they will think the fifth person is less likely to be good," Simonsohn notes. "Of course, we don't get to see their beliefs [about a candidate], but we get to see how they evaluate the candidate. We wanted to know if they give a lower evaluation [to that fifth person], controlling for everything we know about the person they're talking to. It turned out they do get lower ratings."

The hypothesis, Simonsohn says, is that after giving the first four applicants high ratings, an interviewer may be reluctant to do the same for a fifth candidate if he knows that only a certain percentage of individuals are accepted into a program, or that only some will move to the next stage of a selection process. 

"For instance, an interviewer who expects to evaluate positively about 50% of applicants in a pool may be reluctant to evaluate positively many more or fewer than 50% of applicants on any given day. An applicant who happens to interview on a day when several others have already received a positive evaluation would, therefore, be at a disadvantage," Simonsohn and Gino write. By applying the expected overall result of a series of decisions -- in this case, knowing the percentage of candidates accepted into a graduate school program -- to the subset of decisions being made in a particular day, the interviewers are exhibiting narrow bracketing behavior. 

"These arbitrarily created subsets should have no influence on experts' judgments," Simonsohn and Gino add. "While the merit of an MBA applicant may partially depend on the pool of applicants that year, it should not depend on the few others randomly interviewed that day."

This phenomenon is not just confined to the academic admissions world, Simonsohn says. He imagines a similar dynamic playing out whenever individuals are spreading similar decisions out over multiple days, including taking loan applications at a bank or interviewing candidates for a job. (While it is less likely to occur when the process gets down to choosing a single hire, it could come into play in an earlier round that reduces the size of the candidate pool.) "In any setting where people have to make a large set of judgments that is broken down into a small set on the same day, you might see the same thing," he notes. 

The Reason behind the Rankings
Simonsohn was able to observe the narrow bracketing phenomenon thanks to the wealth of data both on the MBA candidates (including their GMAT scores) and the interviewers' overall impressions of them, including a number of sub-scores on specific areas (including communication skills, ability to work on a team and interest in the school). The data didn't, however, point to a definitive answer for why this is happening. 

The effect very well could be an unconscious one, Simonsohn says, or "it could be very conscious. It could be an agency thing. It could be you don't want your supervisors to think you're doing a bad job when they see a bunch of [candidates rated as] fives in a row."

What the research was able to rule out was the effect of seeing a genuinely less-qualified candidate toward the end of the day. Simonsohn notes that he and Gino did an analysis trying to predict the GMAT scores and experiences of the late-in-the-day, lower-rated candidates based on the interviewer's scores. "We couldn't do it," he says "If that last link really is weaker, you should be able to see evidence of that, and that didn't happen."

The paper was also able to rule out a contrast effect -- in this case, judging an applicant based on the person or persons who were interviewed before him or her, noting that there were no significant differences in the sub-scores that rated candidates on certain attributes. "For example, the contrast between an eloquent applicant and an inarticulate one seen back to back should be starker than that between applicants who differ in their overall strength aggregated across a broad range of attributes," the researchers write. 

"The opposite prediction follows from the narrow bracketing account," they continue. "Because interviewers are unlikely to be concerned about keeping a balanced distribution of each sub-score, and they may even have difficulty remembering the sub-scores they gave to previous applicants, sub-scores should more weakly, if at all, be influenced by previous sub-scores."

What Interviewers Can Do
For interviewees, Simonsohn says his findings aren't going to be of much strategic help. "There's no magic in this for the user," he notes. "You can't see who you're competing against and often can't control the timing of your interview.... When the candidates are spread out over weeks and weeks, your competition is the entire applicant pool and not a subset of that. But in reality, your competition is drawn from two pools -- everyone and the other applicants who get interviewed that day."

The effect can be seen even in less-formal daily subsets, Simonsohn and Gino write. "A similar bias may occur when people conduct larger sets of evaluations and generate subsets spontaneously in their minds. Imagine, for example, a judge who must make dozens of judgments a day. Given that people underestimate the presence of streaks in random sequences ... the judge may be disproportionately reluctant to evaluate four, five or six people in a row in too similar a fashion, even though that 'subset' was formed post-hoc."

But companies or universities may be able to control for the narrow bracketing effect in low-cost, low-risk ways, Simonsohn says. His suggestion would be to have interviewers enter each applicant's scores into a spreadsheet or database program that would help them monitor the results of their interviews over time and keep focus off that day's crop of candidates. 

"A spreadsheet keeping tabs on the entire interview process can visually present the distribution of your interview scores, and those scores won't jump out at you as much as several interviews in a row," Simonsohn notes. "It's not very sexy, but it's a low-tech solution and it's low risk."

Simonsohn and Gino's next step in their research is to test their proposed solution in a laboratory setting to see if it has an impact on the narrow bracketing effect. "[Hopefully] it really reframes the bias from the short term to the long term," he says.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

HOW COAL MAFIAS FUEL INDIA'S POWER CRISIS?

By Arvind Behl & Kajol Singh

Seven shots rang out at a wedding reception in this sooty city in eastern India, and Suresh Singh, India’s “Coal King”, fell fatally wounded.

He was a wealthy coal trader, a politician and, police say, a crime boss. At the time of the shooting, Singh had 14 criminal charges against him, including one for homicide. His career and murder are emblematic of one of India’s most nagging economic problems: the corruption that cripples the crucial coal industry.

Monday, July 08, 2013

Actor Hrithik Roshan Is The 'Real Superhero' Of Bollywood

By Niloufer Khan / Mumbai

To pour yourself into a latex suit and save the world by leaping from buildings isn’t an easy role to pull off. Just ask Bollywood’s mega star Shah Rukh Khan. He tried his hand at it in Ra.One. But the billion-plus box office debacle might make him wary of taking on roles with magical powers again.

But there’s one actor in Bollywood who isn’t worried about playing a bloke with magical powers. Say hello to Hrithik Roshan, arguably one of India’s finest looking men.

In 2006, the 39-year-old hero gave movie-mad Indians their first taste of a Superman-style hero with Krrish, a sequel to the 2003 blockbuster Koi … Mil Gaya.

Monday, April 13, 2015

Looking For A Job In UAE? Let The 'Biggest Recruiter' Help

Social media fast becoming biggest recruiter, with both employers and candidates frequenting it.

Your chances of landing a job in the UAE will be stronger and brighter if you keep yourself busy on social media as thousands of jobs are posted on this medium on a daily basis.

Fast becoming the biggest recruiter in the country, social media has become a place where employers come scouting for candidates and vice-versa.

Thursday, April 09, 2015

Focus: Would 'Salman Khan' Still Sell Without Controversy

The star’s run-ins with the law have also been more than that of your average Bollywood guy.

Imagine, for a moment, Salman Khan were to change identities with (insert any uncontroversial, diplomatic-to-the-hilt Bollywood actor)... Sounds sort of unreal, no?

In an interview in 2012, Salman Khan was asked how he managed to not react to the same questions that he is asked in every single media interaction.

Sunday, February 22, 2015

ISIS: Maldives Becoming A Recruiting Haven For Jihadists

India needs to be worried … very worried. If the doom and gloom scenario projected by leaders of Maldives’ major opposition party - the Maldivian Democratic Party (MDP) is true, then the brutally violent Islamic State (IS) may well be setting up base, right in India’s backyard.

It is the most iconic archipelago in the world: famous for its sandy beaches, crystal-clear waters and, as they write in tourist brochures, as close as you can get to “paradise”.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Exclusive: Meet 'Single' Narendra Modi's Wife 'Jashodaben'

By Likha Veer | INNLIVE

The world knows BJP prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi as a 'Bachelor'; however, 62-year-old Jashodaben claims to be the wife of the Gujarat Chief Minister.

 BJP’s prime ministerial nominee Narendra Modi has finally come out clean on his marital status declaring himself as a married man. 

In an affidavit submitted along with his nomination papers filed on Wednesday for the Vadodara Lok Sabha seat, Modi stated for the first time that he is married and that his wife’s name is Jashodaben.

ALSO READ: “I Am Narendra Modi's Wife - Jashodaben Chimanlal Modi"